How to See the Statue of Liberty with Crown Access

The first thing to do once you have booked your trip to New York City is to reserve your Statue of Liberty Crown Access ticket.

How to visit the Statue of Liberty Crown

STATUE OF LIBERTY CROWN VISIT

Statue of Liberty Crown Access Tickets go fast and must be booked in advance

The Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island are highlights of a trip to New York, and the $18 ticket including both is already good value. But for only $3 more for a Crown Access Ticket, you will be whisked past the regular line-up, saving you a lot of wait time, and given access to climb the 393 stairs up inside the statue for an unforgettable view from the crown.

The Statue of Liberty was designed by sculptor Frederic Auguste Bartholdi, and was a gift of friendship from the people of France to the United States. Climbing up to the Crown is a much more intimate experience than the regular tour, as only a few people are allowed up at a time. In 1886 the Statue was completed, and she has since become a symbol of freedom to millions around the world.

Statue of Liberty – Original Torch

STATUE OF LIBERTY – ORIGINAL TORCH

This tour would be a great family outing. The climb is equivalent to 27 stories, so might not be suitable for some younger children, while others will love the challenge. (Children 4-12: $12) Children must be at least four feet tall, and must be accompanied by an adult at all times.

Plan your visit

  • Tickets can only be booked through Statue Cruises, the official provider. Other ticket sellers either don’t give access to the island, just a view from their boat, or are over-priced/scams.
  • Tickets can be purchased online or by phone: 1-877-LADY-TIX (1-877-523-9849) or 201-604-2800
  • Prices: $21/adult, $12/child, $17/senior
  • Ticket includes ferry and access to both Liberty Island and Ellis Island.
  • Audio Tours of Liberty and Ellis Islands are included.
  • This is a high security attraction, and it’s essential to visit the National Park Service information page, so you know what to expect.
  • All crown visitors must be able to climb up and down the 393 steps unassisted.
  • There are 162 narrow and tight steps from the top of the pedestal to the crown.
  • There is no elevator from the top of pedestal to the crown (the Statue’s feet to the Statue’s head).
  • The stairs to the crown are in an enclosed area that can have high temperatures in the summer, so bring water.
  • Try to book your tour earlier in the day as afternoon tours (2pm or later) won’t have enough time to stop at the the Ellis Island Immigration Museum.
  • Ferries leave from two locations: Battery Park, at the southern tip of Manhattan in New York City, and Liberty State Park in Jersey City, New Jersey.

Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she

With silent lips. “Give me your tired, your poor,

Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,

The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.

Send these, the homeless, tempest-tost to me,

I lift my lamp beside the golden door!

 – Emma Lazarus

CLIMBING TO THE TOP

CLIMBING TO THE TOP

STATUE OF LIBERTY

STATUE OF LIBERTY ISLAND

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How to get tickets to the Statue of Liberty Crown

Three Quick Tips for Safe Travels

Be aware of any travel advisories, use common sense, and you don’t need to travel in fear. Here are three quick tips to keep safe while travelling.

When you are overloaded with baggage, you make an easy target.

We’ve traveled in and through London several times, and one time we were at the end of our trip, looking forward to relaxing a few days in a Bath B&B before heading home to Canada. We were carrying our suitcases, along with extra bags with things we bought along the way, and my purse was worn securely across my shoulder.

As we exited the packed subway at Paddington station and headed up the escalator, I realized my purse was gone.  My purse, which contained both our passports, and all but one credit card of my husband’s. All I can figure is the strap must have been cut, and I didn’t notice as my hands were full with my other bags.

After filling out a police report, we made our way to the Canadian embassy, and I was directed across the street where I could get a new passport photo taken.  I was reminded of that day for the next five years by that passport photo of a frazzled me, with messy hair, trying not to cry. Nobody was hurt, we were able to cancel our credit cards and replace our passports in time for our flight home, but I don’t want to repeat that experience. We’ve been in other locations where I’ve been more aware of pickpockets, etc., but in London I felt too safe and was not paying attention to the people around me.

There are at least three lessons I learned from this:
  1. Don’t keep all your valuables in one place. Each person should carry their own passport, and divide your credit cards and cash, carrying some in your wallet, some in a money belt, etc.
  2. If you travel light you can keep track of your things and be a less easy target.
  3. The place you are most comfortable can be where you are most vulnerable.

Take the advice of the locals.

When in Beijing we were told more than once by locals, don’t take a ride on the rickshaws, as they will rip you off.  We took that advice, until one day exiting the Forbidden City, we were tired and the rickshaws were lined up waiting at the exit. Being aware of their tactics, we wisely agreed on the fare to our hotel before hopping aboard. 50 Yuan, that’s five zero, fine.  It was a fun ride, and we arrived safely at our stop.

“That’s $50 US” the driver said.

“No” we said, “50 Yuan”.

“OK” he laughed, he couldn’t fool us.

Unfortunately, we realized we only had a 100 Yuan, and would need change. No problem, our driver had change, and he handed us the fifty and went on his way.  Only then we realized he gave us 50 Rubles, not Yuan, which was probably counterfeit at that. This only cost us about $9, but the lesson was, if the locals warn you, take their advice.

Look both ways when crossing the street.

We are used to automatically looking left when crossing the street, but in London (and Japan, New Zealand, etc.) you usually need to look right. It can be very easy to be on autopilot and step into the traffic.  Play it safe in a new city, and just look both ways.